May 2013

May 2013

All the information listed here is based on my own experience, please carry out your own research before attempting to replicate anything on this site.


SUNDAY, 19 MAY 2013 >>


"Small details"

When it comes to lizards, I've always been a fan of the big and bold species, like monitors and Tokay geckos. Oddly, I recently came across the complete opposite; a small, shy species of nocturnal gecko, which I'm finding more and more fascinating.

The dune gecko (Stenodactylis petrii), also known as the "fairy gecko", is a miniature species from North Africa. At full length, they measure only 3-5 inches, with females being the larger of the two sexes. They are nocturnal in behaviour, and spend the day hidden in burrows and caves, emerging just after dusk to feed on small insects.

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Completely by chance, I've happened to acquire a breeding pair of these wonderful little geckos, which at the moment remain very wary and secretive. They are still in the process of settling into their new habitat, which I have designed to have a deep playsand substrate, and various wedges of bark to burrow under. Being nocturnal, their natural exposure to UV lighting is considered somewhat limited, and I have opted to provide dietary vitamin D3. Like most geckos, they do not tend to drink from standing water, and instead drink droplets of water from surfaces in the tank. To cater for this, their enclosure is finely misted in the morning before a heat light is switched on, to mimic overnight dew formation.

I still have a lot to learn about these geckos, but so far they are active hunters and interesting to watch. I will be moving them shortly into a larger Exo Terra glass vivarium, hopefully with a few new features and even some live plants such as Orchard Grass (Dactylis glomerata) which is native to North Africa as well as Pakistan.

If you have any questions, just pop me an email!,

Best,
Paul Edmondson
info@insectivore.co.uk




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